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Academics

Course Offerings

The academic journey at Bishop Guertin begins with the ultimate goal in mind: to be prepared for college and for life. Our courses are taught with intentionality toward academic formation, quality, depth and breadth but most importantly – integrity. All our courses are college preparatory and our advanced courses mirror a college level experience. Courses at BG are not intended to “pad” a transcript but rather to fully equip the student with knowledge and understanding at their level of academic achievement.

COURSE OFFERINGS

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

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The Computer Science Department at Bishop Guertin presents a curriculum designed to prepare students for the 21st century, where computers are ubiquitous. Starting with the firm foundation in the freshman course, Explorations in Computer Science, each student has the option to take a number of focused elective courses. Depending on their goals and interests, they can take a technical Computer Science path with advanced programming courses (culminating with two AP Computer Science courses), or a media path with courses in graphic arts and multimedia.

 

Explorations in Computer Science (813)                                 

Grade 9 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

This course targets the majority of freshmen entering Bishop Guertin and is designed to give students a practical understanding of what Computer Science is and how it can be applied to all other subjects. Topics of study include human/computer interaction, problem solving, web design, basic video editing, and introduction to programming. Units on internet safety, ethical use of computers, and the societal impact of computing will be covered.

 

Computer Aided Design Fundamentals (816)                        

Grade 9 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Explorations in Computer Science

This course introduces students to Computer Aided Design (CAD) software, allowing them to produce two-dimensional drawings and three-dimensional models. The lessons cover the user interface of the tool, creating and assembling 3D parts, and designing complex shapes using surface modeling tools, which can then be generated using a 3D printer.

 

Python Programming (818)                                                           

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Explorations in Computer Science

This programming course gives students a deeper understanding of programming concepts beyond what ECS covers. Using the industry standard language Python, students will learn about variables, decisions, loops, functions, arrays, and software libraries. The course focuses on universal concepts, and programming on multiple platforms (e.g., Windows, iOS, Android) will be discussed and examined. This course is recommended for students interested in STEM fields other than computer science, where a knowledge of programming is a useful, often required, skill.

 

Programming Honors (823)                                                          

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Explorations in Computer Science and department chair approval

This course is a more in-depth programming course and covers C# application development using Visual Studio .NET. Topics range from a review of the fundamental programming concepts to the introduction of new topics such as arrays, file access, and Object Oriented Design. This is a project- based course. This course is recommended for students with a greater interest in programming and can be used as a prerequisite for the AP Computer Science A course.

 

Networking and Server Technologies (826)                            

Grade 9 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Explorations in Computer Science

This course will teach essential networking technologies and skills, including TCP/IP, stable network creation, wireless networking, mobile devices, and network troubleshooting. Students will learn to use various network components and protocols that enable users to share data quickly and easily. Students will explore the different types of transmission media and learn how network architecture and topologies provide for efficient and secure communication. Students will also learn about the importance of routing and explore IP addressing. In addition, students will learn about the OSI reference model and will explore essential network security concepts, Internet-based challenges facing today’s users, and methods you can use to secure networks and network transmissions, including authentication, encryption, and firewalls.

 

Graphic Design I (833)                                                                     

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Art I and any other Computer Science course

This course, which is eligible to satisfy an art or computer science requirement, is designed to acquaint students with concepts in the art of graphic design from logo development and messaging to introductory exercises and rendering in Photoshop. Students will use Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop as the mediums in rendering creative solutions to different digital challenges.

 

Graphic Design II/Digital Art (834)                                           

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Art I and Graphic Design I or Portfolio Honors

This course, which is eligible to satisfy an art or computer science requirement, is designed to further acquaint students with concepts in the art of graphic design from logo development and messaging to package/promotional art through concepts in digital painting and image manipulation/compositing. Students will use Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop as the mediums in rendering creative solutions to different digital challenges.

 

Introduction to Website Design (835)                                       

Grade 9 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Explorations in Computer Science

WordPress is reportedly the easiest and most popular website management and/or blogging system in use on the Web, supporting more than 60 million websites. Students start by creating their own fully functional websites and mobile applications without using any programming languages. By using templates, widgets, and plugins, they will get a handle on professional looking website designs and blogs without worrying about the back-end coding.

 

Yearbook (841 and 842)                                                                                    

Grade 10 – 12

½ year or full year

0.5 credit or 1 credit

Prerequisite: Explorations in Computer Science and Art I

While the primary objective of the yearbook class is to produce the annual school publication, students will gain much more, such as teamwork, responsibility, brainstorming, writing headlines and captions, editing, typography, design, graphics, advertising, and distribution. Work must be drafted, edited, and revised. It requires a staff that is very dedicated, detail oriented, and creative. Publishing a yearbook is a large but rewarding task. Class size is limited. Class may be taken for a second year; students who take the class a second year may assume major editing responsibilities.

 

AP Computer Science Principles (846)                                      

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Explorations in Computer Science and department chair approval

This course follows the curriculum defined by the College Board and helps students understand how computing and technology influence the world around them. This computer science course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. It is designed for students with a broad range of interests in fields where computing is used as part of the discipline. Extra time after school or at home is required to complete programming assignments. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

AP Computer Science A (848)                                                       

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Programming Honors and department chair approval

This course follows the curriculum defined by the College Board and is designed to give students extensive programming experiences. Using the Java programming language, topics covered will include programming methodology, object-oriented programming, coding efficiency, searching and sorting, inheritance, advanced data structures, language structure, and the ethical use of computers in society. Extra time after school or at home is required to complete programming assignments. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

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The Bishop Guertin English Department offers an integrated four-year program of literature, language arts, and multi-genre writing instruction. Beginning with an introductory course freshman year, students progress through intensive study in the areas of world literature, American literature, and British literature. Together, we explore how influential writers have transformed the literary landscape, whether through poetry, drama, fiction, or nonfiction. Students analyze structure, technique and purpose in order to further develop a sense of self as a global citizen invested in community and humanity. Ultimately, teachers foster an appreciation for reading and writing that leads to lifelong learning and intellectual pursuit.

 

Introduction to Literature

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

To prepare the student for the rigorous demands of high school, this course emphasizes development of vocabulary, grammar, library and research skills, and writing. It includes intensive work in descriptive and expository writing with special attention to prewriting techniques, sentence variety, and paragraph development. Students read, write, analyze, and discuss the literary genres of the short story, drama, novel, and poetry. Each freshman must complete a research paper to receive credit for this course.

 

Introduction to Literature (111)                                                  

Grade 9                

Full year

1 credit

This challenging course is designed to develop and reinforce the knowledge and skills needed by the college-bound student. It stresses academic writing and communication skills as well as vocabulary, reading comprehension, and analysis of works of various genres. Students will master grammar concepts and enhance their reading skills through multiple independent reading assignments.

 

Introduction to Literature Honors (112)                                  

Grade 9                 

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: The department chair will select students who score well on the entrance exam, have supporting grades and recommendations

For the student who has demonstrated outstanding skills in language and literature, this course assumes mastery of sophisticated writing techniques, a strong foundation in grammar, and a love of reading. It will focus on academic writing and literary analysis.

 

World Literature

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Complementing the World History course required for sophomores, this course exposes students to the works of major world authors including a sampling of African, Latin American, European, and Asian writers in a historical and cultural context. Further development of vocabulary, grammar, and library research skills is emphasized. Classroom activities and readings encourage students to broaden their perspectives on literature and life, to develop analytical skills, to think creatively, and to refine their abilities to communicate effectively through the spoken and written word. Selected cultures may include: Judeo-Christian, Greek, Native American, Mayan Indian, Hindu, Buddhist, African, and Middle Eastern. Each sophomore must complete a research paper to receive credit for this course.

 

World Literature (121)                                                                     

Grade 10              

Full year  

1 credit

In the context of world literature from humankind’s oldest stories through Shakespeare, and then to the modern age, students study changing cultural and historical patterns in literature with an eye towards recognizing the shared life experiences that connect all of humanity. The rigorous study of grammar usage skills forms the core of a writing program which seeks to improve students’ clarity of expression as they continue to develop their own unique voices.

 

World Literature Honors (122)                                                     

Grade 10              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Introduction to Literature Honors or A in Introduction to Literature, department application, teacher recommendation, and department chair approval

This demanding historical survey combines a broad perspective on historical and cultural roots of language and literature with deep analysis of important works of literature. Classroom activities and readings stress techniques of critical thinking and analysis applied to various literary styles and philosophical ideas of literature of the past 4000 years. Students write essays and a required research paper to refine their analytic and communication skills.

 

American Literature

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

This course is a historical survey of American Literature from 1620 to the present. Classroom activities stress the writing process and research skills culminating in  a  research project using internal documentation. Students also work extensively with vocabulary and reading comprehension preparation for the SAT. All American Literature classes seek to broaden the students’ perspectives and deepen their understanding of the inevitable relationship between the literature and history of any given era. Selected writers range from Anne Bradstreet to Tim O’Brien. Each junior must complete a research paper to receive credit for this course.

 

American Literature (131)                                                              

Grade 11              

Full year

1 credit

Readings in this course cover historical trends and the evolution of American attitudes and styles as they progress through the Twentieth Century. Through a continued emphasis on the writing process, students are encouraged to perfect all composition skills not previously mastered that will culminate in a required research paper.

 

American Literature Honors (132)                                             

Grade 11              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in World Literature Honors or A in World Literature, department application, teacher recommendation, and department chair approval

This accelerated course will emphasize critical analysis of the essential works in the evolution of American literature as they relate to American history.

 

AP English Language and Composition (138)                        

Grade 11              

Full year

1 credit

This course fulfills the American Literature requirement.

Prerequisite: A- in World Literature Honors, department application, teacher recommendation, and department chair approval

This demanding curriculum will apply critical reading and analysis skills to representative literary works, fiction and nonfiction, of Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Contemporary literature. Lectures, discussions, and class presentations will comprehensively explore the connections between historical periods and their literary manifestations. Emphasis will be placed on frequent analytical and argumentative papers in SAT and AP styles stressing rhetorical structures and strategies such as syntax, diction, tone, purpose, audience, and figures of speech. Students are required to submit an academic, thesis-based research paper. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

British Literature

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Works of prose, poetry, and drama are included in this survey of British literature from Beowulf to the 20th century. All levels stress writing, requiring various college level and analytical essays. Class presentations, extensive work in reading comprehension, and vocabulary will be included. Each senior must complete a research paper to graduate.

 

British Literature (141)                                                                    

Grade 12              

Full year   

1 credit

A chronological course that explores the development of British literature from its origins through the early 20th century, this college preparatory class focuses upon close textual reading, discussion of theme and literary technique, and analysis of the creative process. A research project is integral to this course, as are college essays in the first semester.

 

British Literature Honors (142)                                                   

Grade 12              

Full year      

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in American Literature Honors or A in American Literature, department application, teacher recommendation, and department chair approval

This chronological course in the evolution of British literature from Beowulf to James Joyce explores themes, characterization, use of language, and the literary and social context of diverse works. Students are expected to contribute to the oral dialogue of the class, write original analytical and creative papers, and to read with care and insight. The mid-length research paper is integral to this course, as is the reading of novels. College essays will be explored during the first semester.

 

AP Literature and Composition (148)                                       

Grade 12              

Full year      

1 credit

Fulfills the British Literature requirement.

Prerequisite: B in AP English Language and Composition or A in American Literature Honors, department application, teacher recommendation, and department chair approval

The AP Literature and Composition course is designed with the intent of engaging students in the close, active reading of selections from the Pre-Classical era through the 21st century. In this study of prose, poetry, and drama, students will read with the goal of understanding not only the complexity of a work and its meaning, but also with the goal of understanding how meaning is illuminated by the form of the work itself. Writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of literature, with an emphasis on precision of argument, diction, syntax, and proper explanation of the effects of literary forms and devices. Students will be frequently challenged with on-demand objective assessments and writing assignments. Students are required to submit an academic, thesis-based research paper. College essays will also be explored in the first semester. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

English Elective Courses

 

Drama (156)                                                                                          

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Department chair approval

This course will look at drama through the dual focus of literature and production. Throughout the semester, students explore works in the dramatic arts of several historical periods from classical Greek dramas to contemporary Western theater. The scholarly work will involve analysis of both the written word and the cultural context of each play. The production focus will consider theatrical approaches through live stage plays, film, and classroom performance activities. The course will require individual readings, dramatic presentations, and research projects.

 

Media Studies (153)                                                                           

Grade 11 – 12  

½ year   

0.5 credit

The emphasis in Media Studies is multi-faceted. Students thoughtfully read, view, and discuss the major forms of traditional print and broadcast journalism: news, feature, commentary, criticism, and others. Students explore the history, standards, procedures, and responsibilities inherent in journalism. Students also explore the mass media in general (television, Internet, advertising, public relations, etc.) in order to understand and evaluate the powerful, often controversial, roles of media in modern life.

 

Creative Writing (115)                                                                      

Grade 9 – 10   

½ year   

0.5 credit

This course focuses on the connection between analytical reading/writing and the writing process. Students will read a selection of short stories and study the elements of fiction to develop an understanding of how the elements illuminate understanding and enhance the reading and writing process. Attention to a writer’s responsibilities to audience and society will also be given. Students will then create characters, scenes, and stories of their own. The process will highlight the importance of continued practice and revision and will address how to use constructive criticism – by both self and others – as a tool for the writer’s growth and development.

 

Tolkien and the Catholic Imagination Honors (160)           

Grade 11 – 12  

½ year  

0.5 credit

This course will conduct an in-depth investigation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendarium with a focus on his magnum opus, The Lord of the Rings. The class will examine the deep connections between this seminal work, related texts from within and without his mythology, and the worldview that undergirds it. Students will be expected to read 60-80 pages a week.

 

Expository Writing (154)                                                                 

Grade 11 – 12  

½ year   

0.5 credit

The Expository Writing course teaches students how to incorporate research writing into their own writing for each of the modes of exposition. Analyzing structure, logical premises and conclusions, design, tone, style, rhetorical strategies, and source incorporation, students will read model texts from each of the modes of exposition and then refine their own writing skills. In this course, research writing instruction prepares students to assess, evaluate, and synthesize Internet and database sources to both craft and prove a thesis. This portfolio-based course offers students reflection on their improvements throughout the semester as they prepare for college and university scholarship.

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS

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The Fine Arts Department, inclusive of Studio and Performance Arts, is structured, in broad variety, from basic introduction through developed understanding that grows with advancement over the student’s time at Bishop Guertin. The curriculum aims to prepare students, from new understandings to advanced investigation including portfolio preparation and/or performance preparation, for the post-secondary level.

 

STUDIO ARTS

 

Foundations in Art I (911)                                                             

Grade 9 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Foundations in Art I is a broad-spectrum approach to giving students creative experiences with various mediums and acquaints them with theory concepts including the elements of art and principles of design. Foundations in Art I is designed for the student with an informal interest     in creating art and a more targeted interest in taking Art II or any of the more specific options in the arts curriculum (Pottery, Art Appreciation, Art of Presenting, Photography). An emphasis is placed on experiencing processes of art. Students interested in creating a portfolio in their junior year (with the possibility of taking Advanced Placement Studio Art senior year) or in their senior year are recommended to consider Art I Studio.

 

– OR –

 

Art I Studio (921)                                                                               

Grade 9 – 12   

½ year    

0.5 credit

Art I Studio is suggested for those students who may have an eager interest in art and are possibly interested in taking Art II Honors and eventually Portfolio Honors and/or AP Art. Students considering this course have had some exposure to creative processes in art as well as acquaintance with basic concepts supporting the elements of art and principles of design. Art I Studio is encouraged for those students who are considering the possibility of college art programs or who may be interested in the arts of architecture, photography, graphic design, fashion and/or interior design, multimedia arts, landscape architecture, museum curator/conservator, etc.

 

Art II (925)                                                                                            

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Foundations in Art I or Art I Studio

Art II picks up where Foundations in Art I leaves off. Mediums not covered in Foundations in Art I are explored as well as continued exposure to the elements of art and principles of design. In Art II, an emphasis is placed on experiencing processes of art. Students interested in creating a portfolio in their junior year (with the possibility of taking Advanced Placement Studio Art senior year) or in their senior year are recommended to consider Art II Honors in their sophomore or junior year.

 

Art II Honors (926)                                                                            

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Art I Studio and department chair approval, or Foundations in Art I, teacher recommendation, and department chair approval

Art II Honors is a thorough skill-building course designed to prepare the student for Portfolio Honors in their junior year (with the possibility of taking Advanced Studio Art senior year). Students will be afforded select materials and diverse studio experiences in line with the skill necessary to create work with a higher expectation of finish and presentation. Emphasis is also placed on gaining a deeper understanding and working knowledge of the elements of art and principles of design. Art II Honors is strongly encouraged for those students who are considering the possibility of college art programs or art schools or who may be interested in the arts of architecture, photography, graphic design, fashion and/or interior design, multimedia arts, landscape architecture, museum curator/ conservator, etc.

 

Art 3D Honors (940)                                                                         

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Art I Studio and Art II Honors, and department chair approval or Foundations in Art I and Art II, and department chair approval

Art 3D Honors is a unique course designed to educate and practice artists with a focus on mediums suited to creating in three dimensions. Artists will gain experience with mediums to include but not limited to papier-mâché, plaster, clay, foam core, mat board, stone, and miscellaneous object assemblage.

 

Portfolio Honors (941)                                                                     

Grades 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Art I Studio, Art II Honors, and department chair approval, or Art II, Art 3D Honors, and department chair approval

Portfolio Honors is a rigorous portfolio development class designed to give students the opportunity to create a body of work that may be used in applying to art schools or programs or as supplementary to the standard college application process. Documentation of portfolios for submission, as necessary, is also supported in this course. Emphasis in this course is placed on assembling a diversified and professional portfolio by creating work of guided/suggested subject matter in a range of mediums suggested by the student’s strengths, interests, and creativity. Work outside of the classroom is necessary to complete the requirements of the course. Note: This course is the prerequisite to AP Studio Art. Seniors taking Portfolio Honors will be assigned the fall semester to provide for college application deadlines.

 

AP Studio Art (949)                                                                            

Grade 12             

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Portfolio Honors, recommendation of Portfolio Honors teacher, and department chair approval

Advanced Placement Studio Art is an intense study in 2D design that follows a rigorous curriculum with specific requirements set forth by the College Board. This course is only for those students most serious about their art and who are interested in being challenged to reach their next level artist  in creating thought-provoking work with meaning, direction, and an identifiable style. Pre-course work is expected in the summer preceding the commencement of the class. It is also expected that AP Studio Art students will spend considerable time outside of the class period working on their required portfolios as designated by the College Board.

 

Pottery I (933)                                                                                      

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Foundations in Art I or Art I Studio or any music half credit

This course is an introduction to pottery making and clay sculpture. Various decorating techniques and glazing will be taught. Students will learn of the diversity of the Ceramic Arts as they study artists both past and present. They will learn how the pottery of other cultures has influenced the creation of contemporary ceramics.

 

Pottery II (943)                                                                                    

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Pottery I

In this course students will develop the skills learned in Pottery I as they explore the creative possibilities of clay. The technical considerations of ceramics will be introduced as they learn more about glazes and firing methods. Students will continue to learn the history of the Ceramic Arts in order to develop an appreciation for this art form.

 

Art of Presenting (923)                                                                     

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Foundations in Art I or Art I Studio

Art of Presenting is a course designed to give students practical training and experience in the creation of visual aids and public speaking. Equal weight of the course is given to learning effective public speaking techniques and strategies as to build a complete experience aimed at training the student to be an effective presenter.

 

Photography I (947)                                                                          

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Foundations in Art I or Art I Studio

This is an extensive course for students desiring to learn the operations of a digital SLR camera, with removable lens, and who are seriously interested in going beyond “point-and-click” to producing professional-looking pictures. A great deal of time is spent taking pictures outside of class time and on weekends. Students must have their own digital SLR camera, with removable lens, and camera manual. Enrollment is limited. A Student/Parent Request Form needs to be turned in to the teacher before a signature is obtained on the course selection sheet.

 

Graphic Design I (833)                                                                     

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Art I and any other Computer Science course

This course, which is eligible to satisfy an art or computer science requirement, is designed to acquaint students with concepts in the art of graphic design from logo development and messaging to introductory exercises and rendering in Photoshop. Students will use Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop as the mediums in rendering creative solutions to different digital challenges.

 

Digital Art (834)                                                                                 

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Art I, Art II, and Graphic Design I

This course, which is eligible to satisfy an art or computer science requirement, is designed to further acquaint students with concepts in the art of graphic design from logo development and messaging to package/promotional art through concepts in digital painting and image manipulation/ compositing. Students will use Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop as the mediums in rendering creative solutions to different digital challenges.

 

History of Visual Art (930)                                                             

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Foundations in Art I or Art I Studio

This course will cover a history of visual art beginning with the cave paintings at Lascaux and moving through historical art movements to today’s  current trends. The course concentrates     on learning about visual expression and messaging in art through a combination of learning experiences including lecture review of historically significant artworks credited with being integral in the evolution and development of the common genre timeline as well as occasional hands-on experiences, common assessments, and homework.

 

MUSIC ARTS

 

Band (951 and 953)                                                                                             

Grade 9 – 12       

½ year or full year      

0.5 credit or 1 credit

Musical interpretation, reading proficiency, instrumental technique, and ensemble playing are the basic concepts covered in this performance-based ensemble. Musicians perform in both the Concert Band as well as the Cardinal Marching Band. This course has several outside of school commitments, including fall football games, fall and spring parades, community-based performances, and traditional concert performances. Instrumental experience is required. Students are able and strongly encouraged to repeat this course for credit. Private instruction is also recommended. Enrollment for the year is preferred.

 

Band Honors (952)                                                                            

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Students enrolled in Band Honors must fulfill quarterly responsibilities in addition to those prescribed in the Band course. These responsibilities may include performing individually and/  or in chamber groups at various school and community functions as well as attending approved outside of school performances. Private instruction is strongly encouraged. Band Honors is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only. Those not currently enrolled in Band Honors must maintain an A- in Band for eligibility. Those currently enrolled in Band Honors must maintain a B average for the year in order to be eligible for the following school year. This course is only available to students who are enrolled in Band for the full year.

 

Jazz Ensemble (995)                                                                          

Grade 9 – 12 Full year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Approval of the band director

This performance-based ensemble rehearses at least twice a week after school. Studies are devoted to popular music of American heritage, ranging from early swing, blues, and ballads to contemporary works found in the jazz-rock idiom. Interpretation, style, and ensemble playing are emphasized. Participation in concerts or other performances is mandatory.

 

Orchestra (980 and 981)                                                                                    

Grade 9 – 12       

½ year or full year      

0.5 credit or 1 credit

Musical interpretation, reading proficiency, instrumental technique, and ensemble playing are  the basic concepts covered in this performance-based ensemble. Performances will include the Christmas Concert, Pops Concert, and state or regional festivals. Instrumental experience on violin, viola, cello, or double bass is required. Students are strongly encouraged to repeat this course for credit. Enrollment for the year is preferred.

 

Orchestra Honors (982)                                                                   

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: A- in Orchestra

Students enrolled in Orchestra Honors must fulfill quarterly responsibilities in addition to those prescribed in the Orchestra course. These responsibilities will include performing individually and/or in chamber groups at various school and community functions, assuming leadership roles during rehearsals, and attending approved outside of school performances. Private instruction is strongly encouraged.

 

Introduction to Guitar (973)                                                         

Grade 9 – 12      

½ year        

0.5 credit

Intended for beginners, this course will introduce students to the basics of proper playing position, pick use, left hand technique, music notation, chords, and finger-style techniques. Students will also learn basic ensemble skills in preparation for public performances. Class will be taught on acoustic guitar, but the skills covered will provide a foundation for playing any type of guitar.

 

Introduction to Singing (963)                                                       

Grade 9 – 12   

½ year   

0.5 credit

This course is intended to introduce students to basic vocal technique, choral blend, and various music styles. Students will learn the rudiments of music notation and theory, music history, and ear-training.

 

Girls’ Choir Honors (966)                                                               

Grade 9 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Interview/audition and chorus director approval

The Bishop Guertin Girls’ Choir is designed to enhance the vocal production and ability of female singers by developing a clear vocal tone for a choral setting and balance within three or more parts. This group will perform music of all genres from early music to contemporary a cappella. Students will join the Boys’ Choir for combined mixed performances as well as solo opportunities. A service component is compulsory to fulfill the honors requirement in this course.

 

Boys’ Choir Honors (969)                                                               

Grade 9 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Interview/audition and chorus director approval

The Bishop Guertin Boys’ Choir is designed to enhance the vocal production and ability of male singers by developing a clear vocal tone for a choral setting and balance within three or more parts. This group will perform music of all genres from early music to contemporary a cappella. Students will join the Girls’ Choir for combined mixed performances as well as solo opportunities. A service component is compulsory to fulfill the honors requirement in this course.

 

Monday Night Chorus (970)                                                          

Grades 9 – 12

Full year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Approval of the chorus director

This performance-based choral group rehearses every Monday night for the full academic year. This is open to students who cannot fit Honors Chorus into their schedule and would like the opportunity to perform with Chorus at their annual concerts. Participation in concerts or other performances is mandatory. This group is open to boys and girls. Students in Monday Night Chorus will be considered full members of the choral program and are entitled to all opportunities/performances.

 

Introduction to Music (913)                                                           

Grade 9 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Students in this course will learn fundamental concepts in music, including how to listen critically to a piece of music. An exploration of music’s role in today’s society will be followed by a thorough investigation into the musical elements. Students will analyze songs, using various elements to ascertain a deeper meaning, before studying music in myriad of media. This course includes many listening and writing assignments.

 

Intro to Music Technology (972)                                                   

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Introduction to Music Technology is open to all students, however, high interest in and knowledge of instrumental and/or vocal music is integral to success in this class. The purpose of this course is to build students’ musical awareness through technology-based experiences. Students will develop musicianship in a 21st century environment by completing projects utilizing critical response, reading and notation, improvisation, and composition, as well as some singing and instrumental performance.

 

History of American Popular Music (971)                               

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Students in this course will explore the evolution of popular music in America, beginning with the development of jazz, the transition to rock and roll, and finally the far-reaching genre of pop music. Students will be able to identify important pieces of music, artists, composers, and industry figures, as well as the significance of each to the continued evolution of this important American art form.

 

Music Theory (965)                                                                            

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Students in this course will learn fundamental concepts and techniques related to music theory. Specific concepts include pitch and rhythmic notation, intervals, scales, major and minor keys, triads, seventh chords, and voice leading. Instrumental or vocal experience and the ability to read basic music notation are highly recommended. This course includes daily homework assignments.

 

Applied Topics in Music Honors (967)                                      

Grade 11 – 12      

½ year     

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Music Theory, concurrent enrollment in a music ensemble, music teacher recommendation, and department chair approval

This course is designed for advanced music students. Students enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to explore more challenging musical concepts. Topics may include: performing as a soloist, working with an accompanist, performing in a chamber ensemble, advanced music theory, analysis, conducting, score study, ear training, as well as music history and literature. Students should have prior instrumental or vocal performance experience and understand the basics of pitch and rhythmic notation.

 

AP Music Theory (968)                                                                    

Grade 11 – 12     

Full year      

1 credit

Prerequisite: Music Theory, concurrent enrollment in a music ensemble, music teacher recommendation, and department chair approval

An intense and extended study of advanced music theory concepts, this course follows a rigorous curriculum with specific requirements set forth by the College Board. This course is only for those students serious about music who may potentially be interested in studying music in college. Students will encounter functional harmony, modulation, form, and phrase structure and will expand their aural skills through ear training and sight-singing. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND FITNESS

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Health and Fitness is an integral aspect to the learning process. Our program contributes to the development of the physically literate student through a variety of movement activities, skills, and knowledge necessary to promote lifelong fitness, social cooperation, and healthy well-being. Student learning demonstrates ability to exhibit tolerance for various abilities, contribute as a positive member of the class, and cooperate as a member of a team according to fair play and good sportsmanship.

 

Physical Education (711)                                                                 

Grade 9                

½ year      

0.5 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Physical literacy is the ability, confidence, and desire to be physically active for life. This class encourages these concepts and emphasizes lifelong fitness practices while also providing opportunity for involvement in game play. Personal fitness principles and concepts are introduced and practiced throughout the semester during activities in the gymnasium as well as the Bishop Guertin Fitness Center. In addition, strategies, tactics, and concepts necessary for participation in games will be explored. Extended learning is essential in meeting curriculum goals and may include activities ranging from weekly logs to health and fitness projects.

 

Health (721)                                                                                          

Grade 10              

½ year

0.5 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

This course will help students acquire an understanding of health concepts and skills to apply when making healthy decisions to recognize, improve, sustain, and promote personal, family, and community health. The goal is to increase health literacy in order to apply knowledge and skills to enhance personal health and the health of others. A skills-based approach is the practice for this course. Topics, including but not limited to, mental health, substance abuse, consumer health, and family life will be explored in this comprehensive curriculum.

 

Team and Individual Sports (731)                                                

Grade 11 – 12 

½ year  

0.5 credit

This junior and senior Health and Fitness program stresses participation in numerous individual and team activities. Some examples of team sports for this course are; basketball, softball, volleyball, and speedball. These sports will be played with an emphasis on strategies, sportsmanship, teamwork, and competition. In addition to team sports, additional focus will be placed on lifetime sports such as tennis, badminton, and archery. Calisthenics, plyometrics, and other areas of fitness will be an integral part of the daily program. Extended learning is essential in meeting curriculum goals and may include activities ranging from weekly logs to health and fitness projects. Students wishing to retake a junior/senior course may only do so with administrative and department chair approval.

 

Weight Training (733)                                                                      

Grade 11 – 12  

½ year   

0.5 credit

The curriculum for this course is centered on improvement for the areas of strength training, aerobic fitness, and flexibility. The main goal is to establish, understand, and improve personal fitness levels through safe and proper technique. A personal fitness plan with individual goals will be developed and monitored throughout the semester. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing all muscle groups and developing each through the prescribed plan of resistance training. Lectures pertaining to health and fitness will be incorporated throughout the semester balanced with individual workouts. Students wishing to retake a junior/senior course may only do so with administrative and department chair approval.

 

Fitness for Life (741)                                                                          

Grade 11 – 12   

½ year    

0.5 credit

In this course, students will be physically active while they explore concepts on the importance of physical fitness in everyday life and how making the proper choices can lead to a healthy lifestyle. Students will be introduced to several aspects of fitness which will improve their muscular and cardiovascular endurance, power, and flexibility. Fitness activities may include mindfulness, Pilates, weight training, circuit training, aerobics, and resistance band training. Students will also have the opportunity to learn American Red Cross Standard First Aid, and Adult, Child, and Infant CPR/ AED. Students are provided the opportunity to achieve national certification. There is a minimal fee as an extension of the course and payment is the responsibility of the family. Extended learning is essential in meeting curriculum goals and may include activities ranging from weekly logs to health and fitness projects.

 

Principles of Coaching I (761)                                                       

Grade 11 – 12  

½ year  

0.5 credit

This course uses the National Council for Accreditation guidelines to help students develop a coaching philosophy, season objectives, communication and behavior tools, planning and teaching skills, training basics, and management techniques. A hybrid format will be utilized, as classroom teachings will help to reinforce course components, while time in the gymnasium will allow for practical application through coaching scenarios. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the National Youth Sports Coaching Certification Test. There is a minimal fee as an extension of the course and payment is the responsibility of the family.

 

Principles of Coaching II (762)                                                     

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: A- in Principles of Coaching I and department chair approval

This course is designed for students serious about expanding opportunities and skills acquired in Principles of Coaching I in a PE class setting. Students will actively participate in the organization and execution for proper gameplay and fitness as well as other managerial tasks associated with Health and Fitness classes. The nature of this course requires mature, responsible, self-directed learners interested in pursuing a career in the coaching or education field.

 

Health and Fitness Free Elective Courses

 

Weight Training (FE733)                                                                 

Grade 10               

½ year

0.5 credit

This course does not fulfill a graduation requirement for Health and Fitness. Sophomores can use this class to fulfill free elective credit. The remaining requirement for graduation would still need to be completed junior and/or senior year.

The main goal of this course is to establish, understand, and improve personal fitness levels through safe and proper technique. A personal fitness plan with individual goals will be developed and monitored throughout the semester. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing all muscle groups and developing each through the prescribed plan of resistance training. Lectures pertaining to health and fitness will be incorporated throughout the semester balanced with individual workouts.

 

Fitness for Life (FE741)                                                                     

Grade 10             

½ year

0.5 credit

This course does not fulfill a graduation requirement for Health and Fitness. Sophomores can use this class to fulfill free elective credit. The remaining requirement for graduation would still need to be completed junior and/or senior year.

Students will be introduced to several aspects of fitness which will improve their muscular and cardiovascular endurance, power, and flexibility. Fitness activities may include mindfulness, Pilates, weight training, circuit training, aerobics, and resistance band training. Students will also have the opportunity to learn American Red Cross Standard First Aid and Adult, Child, and Infant CPR/ AED. Students are provided the opportunity to achieve national certification There is a minimal fee as an extension of the course and payment is the responsibility of the family. Extended learning is essential in meeting curriculum goals and may include activities ranging from weekly logs to health and fitness projects.

 

Sport and Performance Psychology (FE763)                          

Grade 10 – 12  

½ year  

0.5 credit

This course does not fulfill a graduation requirement for Health and Fitness. Students can use this class to fulfill free elective credit. The remaining requirement for graduation would still need to be completed junior and/or senior year.

The goals of this course are to improve actual performance by effectively applying sport psychology principles in a performance and quality of life context, as well as to generate interest in pursuing  a career in sport psychology. This class will cover a wide range of topics and skills that improve  sport performance, some of which are mental toughness, the power of relaxation, motivation, visualization, and overcoming fear and “choking.” Both athletes and non-athletes will benefit from this course by learning techniques and strategies to overcome mental blocks and increase their performance in school, sports, and other aspects of life.

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS

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The future success of any Math student depends on the foundation laid in the present. In their first years at BG, we recognize and develop their Math foundation; their demonstrated abilities then determine their subsequent classes. Many of our students progress through a traditional high school Math curriculum of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, then Trigonometry and Precalculus, but some will earn the opportunity to study Calculus (Honors, Advanced Placement AB and BC, Multivariable Calculus) at the college level. In all of their classes, their teachers are with them in class and often after school teaching and reinforcing their skills. By the end of their time at BG, students are ready for their future Math experiences in college and beyond.  

 

Algebra I (411)                                                                                    

Grade 9                

Full year

1 credit

This course covers the basic axioms of mathematics. It is the foundation for all future Math studies at and beyond Bishop Guertin High School. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Algebra I Honors (412)                                                                    

Grade 9                

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Department chair approval based on quantitative scores on the entrance exam, consistent standardized testing, and supporting grades in previous mathematics courses

The standard Algebra I topics are covered in greater depth and at an accelerated pace in this course. Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge of the properties behind the algebraic operations they execute. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Algebra I A/Geometry A (415)                                                     

Grade 9                

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Department chair approval based on quantitative scores on the entrance exam, consistent standardized testing, and supporting grades in previous mathematics courses

This course begins a three-semester study of the basic axioms of Mathematics. Students who complete this course proceed to Algebra I B/Geometry B. Together these two courses provide students the foundation for their future Math studies at and beyond Bishop Guertin High School. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Algebra I B/Geometry B (416)                                                      

Grade 10              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I A/Geometry A

This course begins with a study of later Algebra I topics. It then proceeds to its geometry component, covering topics often seen in national college aptitude tests. These topics are studies through both proofs and geometric constructions. Students who complete this course may move on to Algebra II or Algebra II/Finite Math. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Geometry (421)                                                                                   

Grade 10 – 11

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course is a survey of the foundational concepts of geometry, including basic geometric constructions. Pattern recognition is emphasized, with limited study of proofs. Real world applications are incorporated and some projects are required.

 

Geometry Honors (424)                                                                   

Grade 9 – 11       

Full year      

1 credit

Prerequisite: Department chair approval is required for all students placed in this course

Additional Prerequisites: Freshmen: Placement exam; Sophomores: A+ in Algebra I or B+ in Algebra I Honors

This course includes all topics covered in Geometry but places heavy emphasis on deductive reasoning, including both direct and indirect proof, and analytic geometry. Quarter projects are required.

 

Algebra II (431)                                                                                   

Grade 10 – 11

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

The concepts of Algebra I are reviewed. Students then study varieties of Algebraic expressions, equations, and functions. If time permits, conic sections will be included, as well. Students who complete this course may move on to Trigonometry/Precalculus, Statistics, or Finite Mathematics. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Algebra II Honors (432)                                                                  

Grade 10 – 11

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: A in Algebra I or B+ in Algebra I Honors, and either A in Geometry, or B in Geometry Honors, and department chair approval

Additional Prerequisites: Freshmen: Proficiency in both Algebra I Honors and Geometry placement exams

In addition to the concepts included in Algebra II, additional theorems including key polynomial theorems, natural logarithms, inverse functions, rational functions, and conic sections are  studied. Students who complete this course may study Trigonometry Honors concurrently or Trigonometry/Precalculus in the subsequent year. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI- 84 plus recommended). Students who wish to study Calculus in the subsequent year must take Trigonometry Honors concurrently with Algebra II Honors.

 

Algebra II/Precalculus Honors (434)                                         

Grade 10 – 11     

Full year      

1 credit

Prerequisite: A in Algebra I Honors and A- in Geometry Honors, and department chair approval

Additional Prerequisites: Freshmen: Proficiency in both Algebra I Honors and Geometry placement exams

This course covers the equivalent of three semesters of math in a two-semester course in greater detail and at an accelerated pace. In addition to all the concepts studied in Algebra II Honors, the student will study the six trigonometric functions in triangles and circles, including their graphs and their variations. Students will study and prove Trigonometric identities. Topics will be extended wherever possible to introduce Calculus concepts. Students who complete this course typically proceed to Calculus the following year. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Algebra II/Finite Math (437)                                                         

Grade 11              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

Algebra I concepts are reviewed. The students then study new varieties of Algebraic expressions, equations, and functions. Those topics are studied in business applications where warranted. Students who complete this course proceed to Algebra III. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Algebra III (439)                                                                                 

Grade 12              

½ year      

0.5 credit

First semester only

Prerequisite: Algebra II/Finite Math

Algebra II/Finite Math concepts are reviewed, then further explored. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Foundations of Precalculus (440)                                                

Grade 12              

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Algebra III

The course is an introduction to logarithms, Trigonometry, and other topics. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Trigonometry Honors (436)                                                          

Grade 10 – 11

½ year

0.5 credit

Second semester only

Prerequisite: B+ in Geometry Honors and B+ in Algebra II Honors after first semester, and department chair approval

This course covers triangular Trigonometry and circular Trigonometry, meaning the concept of an angle as a rotation of a ray about a point. All six ratios will be covered. The students will work at solving trigonometric equations and identities. Students who complete this course may proceed to Calculus. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Trigonometry/Precalculus (441)                                                 

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Algebra II

This course covers the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, and other functions and their graphs. The class reviews and covers many Algebra II topics in greater depth to further the students’ understanding, with word problems integrated throughout the course. The study of Trigonometry will include the six basic functions. This course is designed to prepare students to study Calculus in college. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Trigonometry /Precalculus Honors (442)                                

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B+ in Algebra II Honors or B- in Algebra II /Precalculus Honors, and department chair approval This course covers the study of linear,  quadratic,  polynomial,  and  other  functions  including the Trigonometric functions. Precalculus topics review and embellish Algebra II  topics  on a more theoretical and in-depth level. Great emphasis is placed on graphing throughout the year. Trigonometry is covered in depth. The aim of this class is a full preparation for a Calculus class, either in college or at BG. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Statistics (443)                                                                                      

Grade 12      

½ year              

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Algebra III

This course is designed as an introductory course in statistical concepts and is suggested for those who plan to take it in college. Technology is heavily integrated throughout the course. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Statistics Honors (450)                                                                     

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: B+ in Algebra II or B in Algebra II Honors or B- in Algebra II/Precalculus Honors, and department chair approval

This course will introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. It covers four major conceptual themes, including describing patterns and departures from patterns, planning and conducting a study, exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and exposure to making statistical inferences. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

AP Statistics (447)                                                                              

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B+ Algebra II Honors or B Algebra II/Precalculus Honors or Trigonometry/Precalculus, and department chair approval

This college-level course will introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. It follows the College Board’s recommended syllabus for Advanced Placement Statistics leading to the AP exam in May. Independent study will be expected over the summer preceding the course. Students can expect up to one hour of homework on days when classes meet. Additionally, students can expect to be responsible for independent reading of the textbook and other materials between classes. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended). Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

Algebraic Linear Programming (433)                                        

Grade 12              

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Algebra III

In this course, students will learn how to apply functions and matrices in real world applications. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Calculus Honors (446)                                                                      

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B+ in Trigonometry/Precalculus Honors or B- in Algebra II/Precalculus Honors or B+ in both Algebra II Honors and Trigonometry Honors, and department chair approval

Following a review of Algebraic and Trigonometric functions, including their graphs, this course will offer students the study of limits and continuity and coverage of finding derivatives and applications of differentiation, and an introduction to integration. At the conclusion of the course, the student should have a sound preparation for the study of Advanced Placement Calculus at BG or Introductory Calculus at the college level. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

AP Calculus AB (448)                                                                       

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: A- in Trigonometry /Precalculus Honors or B+ in Algebra II /Precalculus Honors, and department chair approval

This course offers a sound development of calculus at the college level. Calculus is the mathematics of change and motion. Both differential and integral calculus are covered in the course. This course follows the College Board’s recommended syllabus for Advanced Placement Calculus AB. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. Students can expect up to one hour of homework on days when classes meet. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

AP Calculus BC (449)                                                                       

Grade 12              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB or Calculus Honors, and department chair approval

This course continues the study of Calculus begun in Calculus Honors or Advanced Placement Calculus (AB). This course follows the College Board’s recommended syllabus for AP Calculus (BC). Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. Students can expect up to one hour of homework on days when classes meet. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Advanced Multivariable Calculus (490)                                    

Grade 12              

Full year 1 credit

Prerequisite: AP Calculus BC and department chair approval

This course continues the study of Calculus at the collegiate level beyond AP Calculus BC. Students can expect up to one hour of homework on days when classes meet. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 plus or TI-84 plus recommended).

 

Basic Technical Drawing (452)                                                     

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credits

Prerequisite: Geometry

This course is for the student interested in technical drawing because s/he wishes to be a drafter, an engineer, an industrial designer, or an architect. The student will be led through freehand sketching to the mechanical drawing of the three different views of objects.

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE

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The goal of the Science Department is to introduce the student to the fundamental concepts of modern science. Learning science requires both the assimilation of many new concepts and the development of critical thinking skills.

 

Biology (511)                                                                                        

Grade 9 – 10

Full year

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Department chair approval/invitation based on quantitative scores on the entrance exam and supporting grades in previous courses

This introductory course is designed to teach the process of science as it applies to biology today. Topics in biology that will be covered include the fundamentals of cell chemistry, structure and function, heredity and genetics, evolution, and ecology. Lab work is included.

 

Biology Honors (512)                                                                        

Grade 9 – 10

Full year

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Department chair approval/invitation based on quantitative scores on the entrance exam and supporting grades in previous courses

The Biology Honors course will incorporate in-depth study, lab work, and discussion while examining the present day molecular focus in biology. Topics to be covered will include an introduction to chemistry and biochemistry, biochemical pathways, cell structure and function, genetics, adaptation, geological history, diversity of life, ecology, and environmental principles. This course will emphasize the underlying themes of biology: interdependence of life, organization, energy flow, inheritance, homeostasis, and evolution.

 

Earth Science (510)                                                                            

Grade 9 – 10

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Department chair approval/invitation based on quantitative scores on the entrance exam and supporting grades in previous courses

This course focuses on the study of space, geologic structures and forces, the waters on our planet, and the atmospheric forces that shape our world. Students will explore the Earth’s spheres including the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and the cycles of the Earth such as the water and carbon cycle. Students will also learn about scientific inquiry, geologic time, space exploration, the solar system, and the universe. The Earth Science course is not intended to replace any graduation credit. This course is presented as an elective for students with an interest in Earth Science and to prepare students for the expectations of Biology and Chemistry in subsequent years.

 

AP Biology (518)                                                                                 

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Biology Honors and B in Chemistry Honors or Chemistry II Honors, or A- in Biology and Chemistry, and department chair approval

The Advanced Placement Biology course is the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory course usually taken by biology majors. As required by the College Board, it focuses on enduring,  conceptual understandings of biology and the content that supports them. The course is centered around four “Big Ideas”: 1) The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life; 2) Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis; 3) Living systems store, retrieve, transmit and respond to information essential to life process; and 4) Biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess  complex properties. The lab component accounts for 25% of the course work and combines content with inquiry and reasoning skills. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

Chemistry (521)                                                                                  

Grade 10 – 11     

Full year      

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra I

This course introduces students to the study of matter and its interactions. Topics of study include: atomic theory, the Periodic Table, naming of compounds, writing chemical equations, the “mole,” gas laws, and an introduction to acids and bases. A series of labs is required.

 

Chemistry Honors (522)                                                                  

Grade 10 – 11

Full year

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: B in Biology Honors or A- in Biology, and department chair approval

Concurrent: Geometry Honors or Algebra II Honors or higher math course

Critical thinking skills are an integral part of learning chemistry. Students who decide to explore chemistry at this level will be required to not only know theory, but to mathematically assess experimental results obtained in the lab. Topics include kinetic theory, stoichiometry, balancing and predicting products of chemical equations, solutions, acid/base reactions, pH, and thermo chemistry. Note to incoming ninth grade students: An incoming ninth grade student who successfully passes the BG Math Department placement exam, allowing enrollment in Algebra 2 Honors or higher, will be invited to take Chemistry Honors in ninth grade. Prior to the math placement, students will be invited into Biology Honors or placed into Biology. This sequence does not exempt the student from the Biology graduation requirement. These students will have the opportunity to take AP Biology (or Biology/ Biology Honors) as a sophomore to fulfill the graduation requirement. Since Chemistry Honors is a gateway course for the majority of the upper level science classes, students will be able take any of the upper level science courses beginning in their sophomore year.

 

Chemistry II Honors (524)                                                             

Grade 11 – 12     

Full year      

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Chemistry Honors and Algebra I Honors or A- in Chemistry and Algebra I, and department chair approval

Concurrent: Algebra II Honors or an honors math course

This course is the continuation of the first-year chemistry course allowing for reinforcement of topics previously covered, study of new topics, and opportunities for more laboratory work. New topics will include thermo chemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. The laboratory portion will enhance investigation, experimental design, and data manipulation skills. Instrumentation (LabPro) and computers will be used for lab data collection and interpretation.

 

AP Chemistry (528)                                                                           

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Chemistry Honors and department chair approval

Concurrent: Algebra II Honors or an honors math course

The Advanced Placement Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of two semesters of general chemistry usually taken during the first college year.  As required by the College Board,    it focuses on enduring, conceptual understandings of chemistry and the content that supports them, the six “Big Ideas.” The lab component is a major focus of the course and combines content with inquiry and reasoning skills. Further emphasis is placed on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology (531)                           

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Students will learn the structure and function of the following systems: integument, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, reproduction, lymphatic, and urinary. General physiology and histology will be covered. Laboratory work, including dissections will be offered. This course should be considered by anyone interested in learning about the human body.

 

Fundamentals of Human Anatomy & Physiology Honors (532)                                   

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit 

Prerequisite: B in Biology Honors and Chemistry Honors or Chemistry II Honors, or A- in Biology and Chemistry, and department chair approval

This course presents a broad overview of the form and function of the human body requiring a greater amount of independent work, as the students cover the cellular/molecular levels, through tissues, organs, and organ systems, with the ultimate goal being to understand the workings of  the body as a whole. In the laboratory, we undertake a broad survey of anatomy and physiology through observation of specimens and slides, dissection of representative animals and organs, and physiological experimentation. Clinical connections to the disease process and medical fields are frequently made, and as such this course is highly recommended for anyone contemplating a career in the health services.

 

Environmental Science (533)                                                         

Grade 11 – 12 

Full year  

1 credit

This course involves the study of the environment and the impact of human activity on the biosphere. This course combines ideas from biology, physics, chemistry, social sciences, economics, politics, and ethics related to the study of the environment. It covers concepts of ecology, air and water pollution, human population dynamics, natural resource management, and climate science.

 

Environmental Science Honors (534)                                        

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Biology Honors and Chemistry Honors or Chemistry II Honors, or A- in Biology and Chemistry, and department chair approval

This is an advanced course in the foundation of environmental science. Material covered includes: the study of relationships between humans and the environment, current and historically germane environmental problems (including their causes and consequences), the production and use of energy, and human population dynamics. Students should expect to complete independent projects and presentations, as well as engage with a variety of on-topic primary documents.

 

AP Environmental Science (538)                                                 

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Biology Honors and Chemistry Honors, or A- in Biology and Chemistry, and department chair approval

Concurrent: Honors math course

Advanced Placement Environmental Science provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Those who take this course should expect to be challenged both in the classroom and in the field. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

Science of Nutrition (550)                                                               

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Nutrition is a science that explores metabolic and physiological reactions of the body to the diet. This course provides an integrated overview of the physiological requirements and functions of protein, energy, and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and disease. Topics include: dietary sources, intake levels, physiological role, and requirement of major nutrients; the biological determinants of nutrient requirements and the assessment of nutrient status in individuals and populations; the role of nutrition in growth and health throughout life; and the role of diet in the development of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, etc.

 

Physics (541)                                                                                         

Grade 12              

Full year      

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

This is a fundamental course in the classical approach to physics. Material covered includes: mechanics (theory of motion), electricity and magnetism, heat, wave mechanics, light, sound, and optics.

 

Physics Honors (542)                                                                        

Grade 11 – 12     

Full year      

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: B in Chemistry Honors or Chemistry II Honors and Algebra II Honors, and department chair approval

Concurrent: Honors math course

In addition to the material covered in College Physics, this course is designed to prepare students for Advanced Placement Physics or to prepare them for college science programs. Excellent math skills are required. Juniors who are admitted to this course may take Advanced Placement Physics the following year.

 

AP Physics C: Mechanics/Electricity and Magnetism (548)    

Grade 12              

Full year     

1 credit

Prerequisite: Calculus Honors or AP Calculus AB, Physics Honors, and department chair approval Concurrent: AP Calculus BC

This course forms the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students planning on majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. The sequence is parallel to or preceded by math courses that include Calculus Honors and Physics Honors. The subject matter of the course is classical mechanics as well as the classical study of electricity and magnetism. The material in this course assumes a basic knowledge of trigonometry and algebra-based physics. It expands on this existing knowledge by incorporating all aspects of calculus in the study of physics. Extra time after school is required to complete some labs. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

Field Ecology (535)                                                                             

Grade 12              

½ year

0.5 credit

This course is a next step for Environmental/Life Science students who are interested in applying what they have learned in the classroom to an examination of local and regional Earth systems. This methods course will focus on the Merrimack River Watershed from its origins in the White Mountains of New Hampshire to its terminus in the Atlantic Ocean at Newburyport, MA. Students will be challenged to learn and practice field biology techniques that allow an inquiry-based elucidation of the relationships between the biosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. This project-based course would require students to complete pre- and post-field assessments. Local and regional field trips and laboratory work away from campus are components of this course.

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL STUDIES

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The Social Studies Department provides students with a comprehensive range of course offerings exceeding the State of New Hampshire’s mandatory  requirements. All students are required to take courses in American and State Government, World History, United States History, and Economics. Students must also take an elective in one of the following areas; Psychology, Global Studies, Law, or Business. Honors level courses are offered throughout the curriculum. Advanced Placement courses are offered in United States History, United States Government, and Comparative Politics. The student progresses from a basic understanding of American Government to an in depth understanding of the United States in a Global world and economy.

 

Citizenship and Government (211)                                            

Grade 9                

½ year      

0.5 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Citizenship and Government is a course designed to provide students with an understanding of the United States and New Hampshire governments. Students will study the principles of the federal and state constitutions. The structures, powers and roles of each branch of our federal and state government will be discussed and students will apply their knowledge in the context of current events. In addition, students will explore the various methods of civic participation that are available to them on a national and state level.

 

World History (221)                                                                          

Grade 10              

Full year      

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

This course exposes the student to the fundamental causes of historical change. The course content includes the beginnings of civilization, the ancient and medieval worlds, and the emergence of the nation-state. While Western civilization is emphasized, the curriculum includes the development of African and Asian civilizations as well.

 

World History Honors (222)                                                          

Grade 10              

Full year      

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: A- in Citizenship and Government and department chair approval

World History Honors has an increased emphasis on intellectual history. Students will be challenged to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills, to participate in complex historical analysis, and to engage meaningfully with primary source documents.

 

United States History (231)                                                            

Grade 11              

Full year      

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

This is a survey course that begins with the Civil War era and reviews key events in American history from the 20th and 21st century. The major events studied in this course are: Reconstruction, Industrialization, the Gilded Age, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, Civil Rights, and the Global War on Terror. Students will be expected to demonstrate a thorough understanding of history through lectures, discussions, readings, writing assignments, and the analysis of primary source documents.

 

United States History Honors (232)                                           

Grade 11              

Full year      

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: B- in World History Honors or B+ in World History, and department chair approval

This course begins with the Civil War era and reviews key events in American history from the 20th and 21st century. The major events studied in this course are: Reconstruction, Industrialization, the Gilded Age, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, Civil Rights, and the Global War on Terror. Students will be expected to demonstrate a thorough understanding of history through lectures, discussions, readings, writing assignments, and the analysis of primary source documents. One to two research papers may be required as well as numerous critical essays. Students must possess excellent writing skills as well as the ability to complete a moderate amount of independent research.

 

AP United States History (238)                                                    

Grade 11              

Full year      

1 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: B in World History Honors or A- in World History, and department chair approval 

The Advanced Placement United States History course is designed to give the motivated student an opportunity to explore in depth the various issues in United States history. The course will place demands on the student equivalent to those made by a full-year introductory college course. This course is designed to provide the student with analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with problems and materials in United States history. The student is expected to interpret primary sources, write critical essays, and write a research paper. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

United States and New Hampshire Government (235)       

Grade 11              

½ Year     

0.5 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

This course is specifically designed for junior and senior transfer students and/or international students who need to fulfill their Citizenship and Government requirement for graduation. The course will cover the fundamental institutions of United States and New Hampshire governments. In addition, the national and local election process will be taught, as well as, various methods of civic participation. It should be noted that this course will only be offered on an as needed basis.

 

Global America Honors (247)                                                       

Grade 11 – 12     

½ year      

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Department chair approval

This course focuses on American foreign policy from World War II to the present. This course will analyze America’s foreign policy since World War II and the role these policies played in shaping America into a global power. The United States relationship with other world powers such as the Soviet Union/Russia, China, the European Union, the Middle East, and Central and Latin America will be the primary focus of this course. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the reasons behind America’s involvement in wars throughout history as well our current issues involving terrorism and conflict in the Middle East.

 

Economics (243)                                                                                  

Grade 10 – 12     

½ year      

0.5 credit

This course fulfills a graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Sophomores: B+ in Algebra I, B+ in Citizenship and Government, and department chair approval

In this course students will develop an understanding of the free market system of economics and the role they play in it, as well as the role it plays in their lives. Furthermore, they will understand the financial and monetary systems, the role of government in regard to economic activity, how economic growth occurs and the standard of living is improved, the business cycle and the decisions of the firm, and other various cycles such as inflation and unemployment.

 

Economics Honors (244)                                                                 

Grade 10 – 12     

½ year      

0.5 credit

This course fulfills the graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Sophomores: A- in Algebra I Honors, A- in Citizenship and Government, and department chair approval; Juniors/Seniors: B+ in an honors math course, B+ in an honors social studies course, and department chair approval

At the Honors level, students are expected to further analyze current and historic events using economic reasoning. Greater emphasis is placed on mathematics and graphing.

 

Theories of Business and Management (246)                         

Grade 11 – 12  

½ year  

0.5 credit

This course will expose the student to the major functions of business and the challenges faced   by organizations in today’s fast-paced, global, and technologically evolving world. Areas of study include, but are not limited to: the impact of micro and macroeconomics upon the organization, the impact of societal change upon an organization, globalization, social responsibility and business ethics. Included is a study of organizational structures such as the types of business organization and the importance of entrepreneurship in a free market, capitalist economy. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to explore and discover a variety of business career paths.

 

AP United States Government (248)                                          

Grade 12              

Full year 1 credit

Prerequisite: B in AP United States History or B+ in United States History Honors, and department chair approval

Advanced Placement United States Government is designed to give the highly motivated student an opportunity to explore all aspects of American government in depth and will simulate a full- year, college-level experience in an introductory government course. A great deal of independent research and a high level of critical reading and writing are expected in this course. Students will study political theory, political beliefs and behaviors, the Constitution, the American electoral system, political parties, the powers of American government, policymaking, and civil rights and civil liberties. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

AP Comparative Politics (249)                                                      

Grade 12              

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: B in AP United States History or B+ in United States History Honors, and department chair approval

This course is offered in the second semester of the senior year and while it is recommended that it be taken concurrently with Advanced Placement United States Government it is not required. This course will provide a comprehensive study of the models and concepts used by political scientists in analyzing political systems throughout the world. In depth studies of the following countries political systems will be studied: Great Britain, Russia, China, Mexico, Nigeria, and Iran. This course requires extensive Independent work and a high level of reading comprehension. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

Psychology (253)                                                                                 

Grade 11 – 12  

½ year  

0.5 credit

This is a survey course that introduces students to a broad range of topics related to the study      of mental processes and human behavior. Psychological development, emotion and motivation, learning theories, memory formation, personality, and abnormal disorders are just a few of the fascinating topics that will be explored in this course.

 

Contemporary Law (255)                                                                

Grade 10 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Sophomores: B+ in Citizenship and Government and department chair approval

This course is an introduction to the American legal system. Students will learn how criminal and civil trials are conducted from jury selection to sentencing. An extensive review of crimes in the United States from D.U.I. to murder will be conducted. Students will learn about their rights in criminal and civil cases. A review of major Supreme Court cases will be discussed. Finally, students will develop a basic awareness of their civil rights and liberties and how to protect themselves as consumers in American society.

DEPARTMENT OF THEOLOGY

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The Theology Department at Bishop Guertin strives to follow in the footsteps of the founder of the Brothers of the Sacred Heart, Fr. André Coindre, who understood that an integration of faith in students’ daily lives was an essential task in a holistic approach to education. In 9th and 10th grades, students study the story of Salvation History in Scripture and Tradition: The Bible and Catholicism. Junior students learn to apply the principles and teachings from Scripture and Tradition to their daily lives in Catholic Ethics and Philosophy. Senior year, students have four opportunities to deepen their faith based on personal interests. Students may choose to see faith applications in society in Catholic Social Teaching, gain a deeper knowledge of the world’s inhabitants and cultures in Comparative Religions, dispel the myth that Science and Theology are in conflict, and delve deeper into contemporary ethical dilemmas in Honors Catholic Bioethics. “While clearly teaching and explaining Catholic belief, doctrine, and practice, we recognize that faith development is a process and that through instruction, formation, and witness, we are called to help empower young people in our care to persistent commitment to and love of others.”

 

The Bible (611)                                                                                    

Grade 9                 

Full year     

1 credit

Salvation History Part I: Scripture

This course provides an overview of Sacred Scripture based on Catholic principles for understanding and interpretation of the Bible. The course highlights the theme of covenant as it draws a path through Salvation History. The different books of the Bible and important events in biblical history are examined to reveal the parts they play in Salvation History and in our world today. The aim is to help guide students in appreciating the Word  of God as a source for spiritual insight, a guide  in prayer, and a moral template that can apply throughout life. This course is designed to invite students into a relationship with Scripture.

 

Catholicism (621)                                                                               

Grade 10               

Full year

1 credit

Salvation History Part II: Tradition

Based on Sacred Scripture and The Catechism of the Catholic Church, this course introduces students to the growth and development of the Catholic Church from the time of the Apostles to today. Students will be introduced to the principles of faith and what it means to be Catholic. Students will also discuss the relationship between reason and faith, the mystery of the Trinity, and the structure of the Church. The seven Sacraments as encounters with God’s grace, the prayers of the Church, and more specifically the Eucharistic Liturgy as the most important prayer of the Church, will serve to highlight the importance of the Catholic Church community as a people of God.

 

Catholic Ethics and Philosophy (634)                                        

Grade 11              

Full year

1 credit

This course is an introduction to the rich  traditions  of  Catholic  Moral  Teaching.  Students  develop an understanding of the major philosophical and theological treatments of moral questions on the relationship between God and man and human nature. Students examine the development of Catholic Ethics by comparing it with the development of important secular ethical systems. Topics of study will include the Catholic understanding of Sin and the need for reconciliation, Natural Law Tradition, Moral Virtues, Human Freedom, Virtue and Vice, and the development of the teaching authority of the Church concerning important moral issues. Central to the discussions of the class are Catholic values that equip students with the formation to exercise sound judgment in the moral issues that they will face in daily life.

 

Catholic Social Teaching (642)                                                      

Grade 12               

½ year

0.5 credit

This course places emphasis on the seven pillars of Catholic Social Teaching: Life and Dignity of the Human Person, The Call to Family, Community, and Participation, Rights and Responsibilities, Option for the Poor and Vulnerable, Dignity of Work and the Rights of Workers, Solidarity, and Care for God’s Creation. In addition, this course will challenge students to make our world better through active service within the wider community.

 

Comparative Religions (641)                                                         

Grade 12              

½ year

0.5 credit

Students will study the history, traditions, and sacred texts of Judaism, Islam, the Protestant denominations, Orthodoxy, Hinduism, and Buddhism in comparison with the Catholic tradition. Guest speakers and visits to places of worship will foster the student’s further understanding and appreciation for encounters with people from a variety of faith traditions.

 

Theology and Science (646)                                                            

Grade 12               

½ year

0.5 credit

Catholicism has a rich history in using faith and reason to understand God, the nature of the universe, and the purpose of life. Modern secular culture often puts faith and reason, Theology and Science at odds and argues that reason and science have made Theology and Faith obsolete. This course will explore how science informs and enhances each student’s appreciation of God’s creation and action. An important goal is to guide students to a more complete understanding of the contributions of Catholic theologians to the advancement of science in a variety of scientific areas including medicine, physics, astronomy, mathematics, chemistry, and others.

 

Catholic Bioethics Honors (644)                                                  

Grade 12              

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: B+ in The Bible, B+ in Catholicism, A- in Catholic Ethics and Philosophy, and department chair approval

The course is designed to engage students in conversation among the disciplines of Theology, Biomedical Ethics, Philosophy, and Science with particular attention to principles and practices. Steeped in Roman Catholic moral teaching, this course will explore the complexities of contemporary medical decision-making, helping students understand the full impact of technology on the human person. Advanced theological, philosophical, biomedical research standards, academic writing, and presentation skills are essential course components.

DEPARTMENT OF WORLD LANGUAGES

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The World Languages Department provides four-year curricula in French, Latin, and Spanish, two consecutive courses in any of which are required for graduation. The department also offers an exploratory program in Classical Greek that may be taken as an elective by upperclassmen.  The modern languages (French and Spanish) emphasize communication through the skills of writing, reading, listening, and speaking. The cultures of the French- and Spanish-speaking worlds are the medium through which these skills are honed. Students who are interested in taking AP French or AP Spanish their senior year must be enrolled in French II Honors or Spanish II Honors their freshman year. The classical languages (Latin and Greek) emphasize a deep understanding of classical, biblical, and medieval texts by means of a thorough grounding in grammar, history, and culture. Students who are interested in taking AP Latin their senior year must be enrolled in Latin I Honors as a freshman. Students interested in taking Greek must be upperclassmen who have either completed their graduation requirement at the honors level or have taken two years of Latin at any level.

 

LATIN

 

Latin I (311)                                                                                          

Grade 9 – 12  

Full year   

1 credit

This course includes the study and application of elementary Latin grammar and syntax, the reading of elementary Latin prose, the study of Greek and Roman myths, a brief survey of Roman history and political institutions, and the study of Roman social culture.

 

Latin II (312)                                                                                        

Grade 9 – 12       

Full year      

1 credit

Prerequisite: Latin I or placement exam

This course begins with a thorough review of basic Latin grammar and continues to build student knowledge of more complex grammar and syntax. Students will develop their skills through extended reading of Latin texts, building their knowledge of classical culture and literature. Students will study the continuous use of Latin into the medieval and early modern worlds.

 

Latin II Honors (322)                                                                        

Grade 9 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: A- in Latin I or placement exam, and department chair approval

This course contains a brief review of elementary Latin grammar, the study and application of intermediate Latin syntactic structure, further reading of Latin prose, the life and literary works of Julius Caesar, and a closer study of Roman history and political institutions.

 

Intermediate Latin (313)                                                                 

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: C- in Latin II or Latin II Honors, and department chair approval

Students will review Latin grammar and vocabulary before moving on to read adapted and non- adapted selections from writers such as Caesar and Ovid, as well as deepen their understanding of Latin syntax and Roman culture.

 

Advanced Latin Honors (323)                                                       

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B- in Latin II Honors, A- in Latin II, or B in Intermediate Latin, and department chair approval

Students will read selections from classical authors such as Cicero, Sallust, and Pliny. Selections from Medieval Latin prose and excerpts from the poetry of Ovid may be included at the instructor’s discretion. Literary study is combined with continued grammar and syntax application and the study of Roman history.

 

Latin Seminar Honors (324)                                                          

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B- in Advanced Latin Honors or AP Latin, and department chair approval

This course is an advanced seminar-style investigation of the works of Golden Age Latin writers such as Catullus, Cicero, Horace, and Ovid. Students will read, translate, understand, analyze, and interpret selected poems and prose works in the context of Roman culture, as well as literary and political history.

 

AP Latin (329)                                                                                      

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B- in Advanced Latin Honors or Latin Seminar Honors, and department chair approval This course is designed for superior Latin students. The course follows an Advanced Placement Latin syllabus. Students will read, translate, understand, analyze, and interpret selections from Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s De Bello Gallico. The works will be considered in terms of late 1st century BC history and culture. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

Introduction to Greek Honors (372)                                          

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Completion of the Department of World Languages graduation requirement at the Honors level or two years of Latin with a B- average, and department chair approval

This half-year course is intended primarily as an introduction to the basic grammar and vocabulary of Classical Greek. Students will learn the Greek alphabet, noun and verb forms, and basic syntax. The cultural background of the language will be brought to life through readings in translation of Greek historians, philosophers, playwrights, and poets. Additionally, students will be introduced to the Bible in its original Greek through excerpts from the New Testament.

 

Intermediate Greek Honors (374)                                               

Grade 11 – 12

½ year

0.5 credit

Prerequisite: C- in Introduction to Greek Honors and department chair approval

This course continues the study of Classical Greek. Students will learn more advanced grammar and syntax, delve more deeply into Greek history and culture, and be exposed to a larger variety of classical and biblical texts.

 

FRENCH

 

French I (331)                                                                                       

Grade 9 – 11  

Full year   

1 credit

This course is for students who have never taken French, as well as for students who have not yet mastered the requirements of Bishop Guertin’s French I curriculum. The focus in the first quarter is “survival French,”  which includes the basics necessary to communicate with native speakers in common, everyday situations. After the first quarter, the study of vocabulary and grammar intensifies. Students develop communication skills in a cultural context. The cultural themes of the course include daily activities, people and their possessions, city life, buying clothes, leisure- time activities, and food. The geography and contemporary culture of the Francophone world are introduced, with an emphasis on Paris and France.

 

French II (332)                                                                                     

Grade 9 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: French I or placement exam

This course offers the student the opportunity to further master the elementary level of the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students review and add to the fundamental vocabulary and grammatical structures of French I. Culture focuses on French-speaking regions of North America, and the Franco-American heritage of the New England region is emphasized.

 

French II Honors (342)                                                                    

Grade 9 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: A- in French I or placement exam, and department chair approval

This course is designed for enthusiastic and talented students pursuing a more rigorous study of French II. In addition to the French II description, the student will be expected to demonstrate a higher level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The honors curriculum includes expanded vocabulary, grammar and cultural study, more demanding communicative activities, and a greater degree of independent work.

 

French III (333)                                                                                   

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: C- in French II or French II Honors

Intermediate grammar, syntax, and functional conversation skills are stressed. Emphasis is also placed on reading comprehension using a variety of literary works. Vocabulary acquisition is enhanced through an introduction to the art, cinema, and history of the French speaking world.

 

French III Honors (343)                                                                  

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in French II Honors or A- in French II, and department chair approval

In addition to the French III description, the course centers on readings and discussions of selected representative works of Francophone authors. This is a challenging, fast-paced course. Students undertake a thorough study of intermediate grammar and its application to the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

 

French IV (334)                                                                                   

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: C- in French III or French III Honors

This course is a continuation of French III. Further development of intermediate grammar and vocabulary building in context is emphasized. Classroom activities encourage students to continue to develop functional language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

 

French IV Honors (344)                                                                   

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in French III Honors and department chair approval

This course completes the advanced topics in French grammar and continues to broaden and deepen the scope of vocabulary needed for successful communication. The students will develop a high level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills by completing the study of advanced grammatical structures and through active classroom participation. They will explore the cultures of the Francophone world through the use of authentic documents and literature. The course is designed to prepare the students for college course work in French.

 

French Seminar Honors (345)                                                       

Grade 12              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in French IV Honors and department chair approval

This accelerated course is designed for the student who wishes to pursue a more rigorous study of advanced French. The students will develop a high level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through active classroom participation. Grammar is reviewed whenever necessary in order to reinforce proficiency. Students will explore the cultures of the Francophone world through the use of authentic documents and literature. The course is designed to prepare students for college course work in French.

 

AP French Language (348)                                                             

Grade 12              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in French IV Honors and department chair approval

This course is designed for superior fourth and fifth year French students. The course follows an Advanced Placement French syllabus. Written and spoken expression for competency is expected. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

SPANISH

 

Spanish I (351)                                                                                     

Grade 9 – 11  

Full year   

1 credit

This course is for students who have never taken Spanish or as well as for students who have not yet mastered the requirements for those who have not met the requirements of Bishop Guertin’s Spanish I curriculum. Its focus is on the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. The development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills is emphasized. Students are introduced to Spanish and Latin American cultures.

 

Spanish II (352)                                                                                   

Grade 9 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish I or placement exam

This course offers the student the opportunity to further master the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students review and add to the fundamental vocabulary and grammatical structures of Spanish I. Spanish and Latin American cultures will be explored in greater depth.

 

Spanish II Honors (362)                                                                  

Grade 9 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: A- in Spanish I or placement exam, and department chair approval

This course is designed for enthusiastic and talented students pursuing a more rigorous study of Spanish II. In addition to the Spanish II description, the student will be expected to demonstrate  a higher level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The honors curriculum includes expanded vocabulary, grammar and cultural study, more demanding communicative activities, and a greater degree of independent work.

 

Spanish III (353)                                                                                 

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: C- in Spanish II or Spanish II Honors

Students will continue their study of the Spanish language via an emphasis on all communications skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) and cultural study. Advanced topics in vocabulary, grammar, and syntax are introduced. The study of culture is enriched through various topics.

 

Spanish III Honors (363)                                                                

Grade 10 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Spanish II Honors or A- in Spanish II, and department chair approval

This course is designed for enthusiastic and talented students pursuing a more rigorous and detailed study of Spanish III. In addition to the Spanish III description, the student will be expected to demonstrate a higher level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The honors curriculum includes expanded vocabulary and grammar study, more demanding communicative activities, and a greater degree of independent work.

 

Spanish IV (354)                                                                                 

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: C- in Spanish III or Spanish III Honors

This course continues advanced Spanish grammar, vocabulary building in context, and the enhancement of communicative skills through a variety of collaborative activities as well as independent work. Course content focuses on universal themes, contemporary issues, and culture through diverse media.

 

Spanish IV Honors (364)                                                                 

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Spanish III Honors and department chair approval

Spanish IV Honors is a pre-AP class designed for students who plan to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture course the following year, as well as for students who wish to advance their language studies. The main focus is the refinement of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Students will be rigorously challenged by activities, which require the communicative use of all these skills. Thematic units of study are based on the AP global themes.

 

Spanish V (355)                                                                                   

Grade 12              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: C- in Spanish IV or Spanish IV Honors

This is a project-based course designed for students who wish to continue their studies in Spanish. Students will broaden their understanding of Spanish through the introduction of new vocabulary and grammatical structures. Additionally, they will develop a higher level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through active classroom participation. Cultural themes will be explored through the use of authentic documents, literature, and film.

 

AP Spanish Language and Culture (368)                                  

Grade 12              

Full year

1 credit

Prerequisite: B in Spanish IV Honors and department chair approval

Students will be rigorously challenged by activities which require the communicative use of all language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Students will strengthen their interpretive, interpersonal and presentational skills by engaging in a variety of activities in the target language. Thematic units of study are aligned with the College Board Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture course description and AP global themes. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.

 

AP CAPSTONE

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The Advanced Placement Capstone program was designed to equip students with the independent research, collaboration, and communication skills which colleges value. The complete program consists of two courses: AP Seminar and AP Research. These courses are designed to complement and enhance discipline-specific study in other AP courses.

 

In the complete AP Capstone program, students would take AP Seminar in Grade 11, followed by AP Research in Grade 12. Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research and on four additional AP Exams of their choosing receive the AP Capstone Diploma™. Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research, but not on four additional AP Exams, receive the AP Seminar and Research Certificate™.

Currently AP Seminar is the only course offered, however future student interest and teacher availability may allow the school to offer AP Research in future years.

 

AP Seminar                                                                                           

Grade 11 – 12

Full year

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Enrollment in American History Honors or AP United States History, American Literature Honors or AP Language and Composition, and approval by the Vice Principal

AP Seminar is a course designed to equip intellectually curious, independent learners with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments. Students engage in cross-curricular research and conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by considering divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team.

 

AP Research

Prerequisite: AP Capstone Seminar

AP Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.